Programs & Courses

Course Outlines

Covenant Canadian Reformed Teachers College offers several course programs in preparation for a teaching career in Reformed schools:


Foundational Studies

Foundational Studies consist of courses that prepare teacher candidates with foundational religious/philosophical/theoretical and cultural/social/political-context understandings needed to teach in a Reformed Christian school. While links will inevitably be made with classroom practice and realities of the world in which we live, the emphasis is on developing thoughtful understanding, knowledge, skills, and commitment that will serve as the teacher candidate’s critical basis for and outlook on Reformed Christian education. Foundational Studies comprises four sub-groups: Religious Studies, Education Studies, Educational Psychology, and Culture, Ethics, and Worldview.


100 - Religious Studies

Religious Studies consist of courses designed to help teacher candidates cultivate foundational and thoughtful understanding of the content and message of the Bible, as well as the history of the Christian Church from Pentecost to today.


Bible Studies

The Bible courses provide students with an in-depth survey of the covenantal and redemptive history of God’s self-revelation as recorded in the Bible. Background information from world history, geography, and archaeology relevant to the history of the bible will be included as appropriate. Emphasis will be placed on skills necessary for responsible and effective teaching of Bible history.

DT 101 - Bible Study: Survey of Old and New Testament 1 (3.0 credits)

This course will survey the main contents of Biblical History from Genesis 1 to the Captivity of Judah. This period also includes the Wisdom Literature and the most of the Old Testament Prophets. The course will identify thematic lines that run through this part of Biblical history. An outline of each narrative Bible books will be presented, as well as the main themes in each of these books. The aim of the course is to help teacher candidates in their preparation for teaching Biblical history by looking at the main themes and lines in the history of redemption. This will expose them to a thematic lesson planning approach. Students are required to make presentations on topics connected to the customs and ceremonies of the Old Testament as well as to the world of the Old Testament. Choices for these presentations will reflect the Primary/Junior or Junior/Intermediate teaching focus.

DT 102 - Bible Study: Survey of Old and New Testament 2 (3.0 credits)

This course will survey the main contents of Biblical history from the captivity of Judah to the end of Acts. This includes the time between the Old and New Testament and the New Testament Letters. The course will identify thematic lines that run through this part of Biblical history.  An outline of each narrative Bible books will be presented, as well as the main themes in each of these books. The aim of the course is to help teacher candidates in their preparation for teaching Biblical history by looking at the main themes and lines in the history of redemption. This will expose them to a thematic lesson planning approach. Students are required to make presentations on topics connected to the time between the Testaments and the Gospels. Choices for these presentations will reflect the Primary/Junior or Junior/Intermediate teaching focus.

DT 103 - Biblical History and Reformed Doctrine (3.0 credits)

The teaching of Biblical History is to be done within the framework of the Reformed confessions. This perspective explains the two components of the course: Reformed Doctrine and Narration of Biblical History. This course builds on the other Bible courses (DT 101; DT 102).

Part 1 • Reformed Doctrine: Survey of Reformed and Presbyterian Confessions
This part of the course works within the context of the historical developments in the Reformed Christian churches hailing from the 16th Century Reformation. As such, the course deals with all the topics of Reformed doctrine by examining the Scriptural basis for each doctrine, and by studying the expressions and terms used in Scripture and confessions. Throughout the course, connections will be made to doctrinal issues in church history and to current doctrinal issues. Where applicable, direct links to classroom practice will be made. The connection between doctrine and life, as well as between doctrine and personal faith will receive attention.

Part 2 • Narration of Biblical History
The purpose of this part of the course is to equip the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to prepare for teaching Biblical history, and in particular the narration of it. Teacher candidates will work with the main themes of the history of redemption and apply these to their Primary/Junior or Junior/Intermediate teaching focus. They will become acquainted with different approaches to working with the narratives of the Bible. The CARE templates will be used as the model for preparing Bible lessons. Although the emphasis of the course is on working properly with the material necessary for narration, the course will also pay attention to teaching Biblical History in different non-narration formats for the Junior/Intermediate level. The link with the Reformed confessions will be emphasized.

EDU 101 - Bible Study: Survey of Old and New Testament 1 (3.0 credits)

This course is a survey of the main contents of Biblical history from Genesis 1 to the Captivity of Judah. This period also includes the Wisdom literature of the Old Testament and the most of the Old Testament Prophets. The course will identify thematic lines that run through this part of Biblical history. An outline of each narrative Bible books will be presented, as well as the main themes in each of these books. The aim of the course is to help teacher candidates in their preparation for teaching Biblical history by looking at the main themes and lines in the history of redemption. This will expose them to a thematic lesson planning approach. Students are required to make presentations on topics connected to the customs and ceremonies of the Old Testament as well as to the world of the Old Testament. Choices for these presentations will reflect the Primary/Junior or Junior/Intermediate teaching focus.

EDU 102 - Bible Study: Survey of Old and New Testament 2 (3.0 credits)

This course is a survey of the main contents of Biblical history from the Captivity of Judah to the end of Acts. This includes the time between the Old and New Testament and the New Testament Letters. The course will identify thematic lines that run through this part of Biblical history. An outline of each narrative Bible book will be presented, as well as the main themes in each of these books. The aim of the course is to help teacher candidates in their preparation for teaching Biblical history by looking at the main themes and lines in the history of redemption. This will expose them to a thematic lesson planning approach. Students are required to make presentations on topics connected to the time between the Testaments and the Gospels. Choices for these presentations will reflect the Primary/Junior or Junior/Intermediate teaching focus.


Church History Studies

These first two courses are offered in a 2-year cycle; the third course is offered every year. Although there is a chronological sequence, each course stands independent from the others. All three courses emphasize the use of themes to give structure and focus to church history.  Each course has a dual focus:  the content of church history and the pedagogical principles and methods for teaching church history.

DT 104 - Church History 1: From Pentecost to the Renaissance (3.0 credits)

This course traces the history of the church of Jesus Christ from Pentecost (c. A.D. 30) through the fall of the Roman Empire to the concluding centuries of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance (c. 1400). Topics focus on the struggle of the church against heresy, persecution, domination by the state, and papal hierarchy. 

DT 105 - Church History 2: From Renaissance to Revolution (3.0 credits)

This course traces the history of the church of Jesus Christ from the Renaissance (c. 1400) through the ages of Reformation and Enlightenment to the 18th century revival and missionary movements (c. 1800). Reformation is followed by division as the church of Jesus Christ struggles to live by the Word of God in an increasingly humanistic world climate. A divided Christian church begins to bring the gospel to the ends of the earth during the 17th and 18th centuries.

DT 106 - Church History 3: From Revolution to the Present Including Developments in North America (3.0 credits)

This course traces the history of Reformed churches in the Netherlands after ca.1800 and their North American “daughter” churches, with particular attention for the roots and ecclesiastical contacts of the Canadian Reformed Churches. It explores the origins of various other churches on the Atlantic seaboard in the 17th and 18th centuries, their establishment in Canada after the American Revolution, and their current presence and characteristics as “neighbourhood churches”. The course incorporates the pedagogy of teaching Church History.

DT 507 - Foundations of Reformed Ethics and Ethical Standards of Practice (3.0 credits)

The norms of Scripture and the principles derived from the Ten Commandments will be applied to ethical issues in society and education. Special attention will be given to The Ethical Standards for the Teaching Profession (OCT, 2016) and their implications for professional practice in Reformed Christian schools. One module focuses on Christian intellectual character development for teacher candidates and the application in a primary/junior or junior/intermediate classroom setting.

EDU 104 - Church History 1: From Pentecost to Renaissance (3.0 credits)

This course traces the history of the church of Jesus Christ from Pentecost (c. 30) through the fall of the Roman Empire to the concluding centuries of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance (c. 1400). Topics focus on the struggle of the church against heresy, persecution, domination by the state, and papal hierarchy. Students conduct an independent research project on the increasingly apparent need for Reformation during the Renaissance; how it actually happened and was resisted in one relevant European country; and what became of it during the 17th and 18th centuries of Rationalism and the Enlightenment.

EDU 105 - Church History 2: From Renaissance to Revolution (3.0 credits)

This course traces the history of the church of Jesus Christ from the Renaissance (c. 1400) through the ages of the Reformation and Enlightenment to the 18th-century revival and missionary movements (c. 1800). Reformation is followed by division as the church of Jesus Christ struggles to live by the word of God in an increasingly humanistic world climate leading up to the French Revolution. A divided Christian church begins to bring the gospel to the ends of the earth during the 17th and 18th centuries. Students conduct an independent study on an aspect of Church historical developments prior and connecting to the Renaissance. Topics could include the Development of Heresies and Creeds; Persecution and Growth; Church, State, and Investiture; Islam and the Crusades.

EDU 106 - Church History 3: From Revolution to the Present Including Developments in North America (3.0 credits)

This course traces the history of Reformed churches in the Netherlands after c. 1800 and their North American “daughter” churches, with particular attention for the roots and ecclesiastical contacts of the Canadian Reformed Churches. It explores the origins of various other churches on the Atlantic seaboard in the 17th and 18th centuries, their establishment in Canada after the American Revolution, and their current presence and characteristics as “neighbourhood churches”. The course incorporates the pedagogy of teaching Church History.

EDU 107 - Church History 4: From Pentecost to the 19th Century (3.0 credits)

This course traces the history of the Church of Jesus Christ with a European emphasis. The first part (Early Christian Church to the Middle Ages), focuses on the struggle of the Church against heresy, persecution, domination by the state, and papal hierarchy. The second part focuses on developments from the Renaissance (c. 1400) through the ages of Reformation and Enlightenment, to the 18th century revival and missionary movements (c. 1800).


200 - Education Studies

Education Studies consist of courses that help teacher candidates develop a biblically sound view of the nature and purpose of Reformed education by exposing them to philosophical and worldview perspectives that underlie education. Through the lens of a Reformed Christian worldview teacher candidates will critically examine various curriculum perspectives, conduct educational research and come to understand their role as teachers in the school and in the community

DT 201 - Foundations of Reformed Education (3.0 credits)

This course examines the structure of a Reformed Christian school in which biblical instruction across the entire curriculum is normative. Relationships between home, school, and church are explored, with a special emphasis on the home-school (parent-teacher) relationship in the teaching and learning setting of the classroom. The course includes topics such as school governance and government relations.

DT 202 - Foundations of Curriculum in a Christian Context (3.0 credits)

An introduction to the elements and development of curriculum at various levels (from philosophical to practical units of study), and associated issues and tensions.  Students examine a variety of curriculum orientations and how they are reflected in the Ontario curriculum and educational journals, and applied in secular and Christian textbooks/units of study. Applying the theory, students prepare a critique of a curriculum unit.

DT 203 - Introduction to Educational Research (3.0 credits)

Given the significance of research in today’s educational settings, this course introduces students to various research designs, methods, and approaches, and to the tenets of doing educational research responsibly. Students learn how to design, research, and report on an inquiry topic related to education in the elementary and/or secondary school setting. Students will select a topic that is relevant to their Primary/Junior or Junior/Intermediate specializations. With the guidance of a faculty advisor, they will experience how to access, interpret, evaluate and use educational research literature. Using a collegial and collaborative approach, they will collect and use data responsibly in conjunction with other information and knowledge. Students will be expected to share their research with faculty and fellow-students in a formal presentation setting. The evaluation of the final project will include a second reader selected from the faculty.

DT 204 - History of Education (3.0 credits)

A historical survey of the purpose and practice of education in its social and political context from the Greek and Roman to Western civilization in general, with a focus on developments in Canada and specifically in Ontario from about 1800 to today. Along with attention for the relevance of each era for today, special emphasis is placed on the role of the parents, the state, and the church. 

DT 205 - Mathematics for Elementary Teachers (3.0 credits)

This course is a survey of mathematical topics within the Ontario Curriculum Grades 1-8 Mathematics: Primary/Junior specialists (grades 1-6) and Junior/Intermediate specialists (grades 4-10). Problem solving and conceptual understanding will be an integral part of the course. Through practice, the course is intended to prepare teachers to teach mathematics in Christian elementary schools with confidence.

DT 206 - Schooling, Government, and Society (3.0 credits)

This course focuses on the legal and moral duties, rights, and responsibilities of teachers in the context of the Ontario College of Teachers document, The Standards of Practice for the Teaching Profession (OCT, 2016). Legislation, government policies and regulations regarding education in Ontario are reviewed in relation to the applicability to Reformed Christian schools. Issues of particular relevance to today’s society will also be discussed in light of the teacher’s role within a school setting.

EDU 201 - Foundations of Reformed Education (3.0 credits)

This course examines the structure of a Reformed Christian school in which Biblical instruction across the entire curriculum is normative. Relationships between home, school, and church are explored, with a special emphasis on the home-school (parent-teacher) relationship in the teaching and learning setting of the classroom. 

EDU 202 - Foundations of Curriculum in a Christian Context (3.0 credits)

An introduction to the elements and development of curriculum at various levels (from philosophical to practical units of study), and associated issues and tensions.  Students examine a variety of curriculum orientations and how they are reflected in the Ontario curriculum and educational journals, and applied in secular and Christian textbooks/units of study. Applying the theory, students prepare a critique of a curriculum unit applicable to their Primary/Junior or Junior/Intermediate specialization.

EDU 203 - Introduction to Educational Research (3.0 credits)

Given the significance of research in today’s educational settings, this course introduces students to various research designs, methods, and approaches, and to the tenets of doing educational research responsibly. Students learn how to design, research, and report on an inquiry topic related to education in the elementary and/or secondary school setting. Students will select a topic that is relevant to their Primary/Junior or Junior/Intermediate specializations. With the guidance of a faculty advisor, they will experience how to access, interpret, evaluate and use educational research literature. Using a collegial and collaborative approach, they will collect and use data responsibly in conjunction with other information and knowledge. Students will be expected to share their research with faculty and fellow-students in a formal presentation setting. The evaluation of the final project will include a second reader selected from the faculty. 

EDU 204 - History of Education (3.0 credits)

A historical survey of the purpose and practice of education in its social and political context from the Greek and Roman to Western civilization in general, with a focus on developments in Canada and specifically in Ontario from about 1800 to today. Along with attention for the relevance of each era for today, special emphasis is placed on the role of the parents, the state, and the church.

EDU 205 - Mathematics for Elementary Teachers (3.0 credits)

This course is a survey of mathematical topics within The Ontario Curriculum Grades 1-8 Mathematics: primary/junior specialists (grades 1-6) and junior/intermediate specialists (grades 4-10). Problem solving and conceptual understanding will be an integral part of the course.  Through practice, the course is intended to prepare teachers to teach mathematics in Christian elementary schools with confidence.

EDU 206 - Schooling, Government, and Society (3.0 credits)

This course focuses on the legal and moral duties, rights, and responsibilities of teachers in the context of the Ontario College of Teachers document, The Standards of Practice for the Teaching Profession (OCT, 2016). Legislation, government policies and regulations regarding education in Ontario are reviewed in relation to the applicability to Reformed Christian schools. Issues of particular relevance to today’s society will also be discussed in light of the teacher’s role within a school setting.


300 - Studies in Educational Psychology

Studies in Educational Psychology consist of courses that focus on foundational theory and research on physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development. Attention will be paid to learning theories and assessment, diversity among learners, and provisions for students with special needs. A primary emphasis in these courses is the development of a sound understanding of the covenant child and his/her uniqueness as a creature of God in the context of Reformed Christian schooling.

DT 301 - Learning Theories (3.0 credits)

After a brief introduction to educational psychology, behaviourist, cognitive, and constructivist theories of learning and their application to the classroom setting are examined and evaluated from the Biblical perspective that every child is a unique creature of God. The work of theorists such as Pavlov, Skinner, Piaget, Bruner, Vygotsky and others will be introduced.

DT 302 - Assessment (3.0 credits)

This course introduces students to assessment in education. It is based on the premise that the assessment for, as, and of learning is a vital component of the instructional process and that the primary purpose is the improvement of learning. Topics include traditional and authentic assessment, use of rubrics, differentiated instruction and assessment, and portfolio assessment.  This course includes a detailed study of the Ontario Ministry of Education document Growing Success.

DT 303 - Child Development (3.0 credits)

This course presents a brief historical overview of the child and his/her place in culture, society, family, and school. The physical, cognitive, and psycho-social dimensions of child development are examined from the beginning of life at conception, and special attention is paid to the school-aged and adolescent youngster.

Throughout the course explicit connections will be made to learning and to current issues that affect schooling.

DT 304 - Special Education (3.0 credits)

This course acquaints students with a wide range of special needs children within a typical classroom setting in a Reformed Christian school.

Suggestions for early detection, referral, and initial modification of programs and materials are presented. In addition, specific teaching approaches (e.g., differentiated instruction) and the role of the teacher in implementing IEPs will be introduced.

Topics such as anxiety and depression will receive special emphasis. Students will be expected to tailor their readings and assignments to reflect their teaching interests.

EDU 303 - Child Development (3.0 credits)

This course presents a brief historical overview of the child and his/her place in culture, society, family, and school. The physical, cognitive, and psycho-social dimensions of child development are examined from the beginning of life at conception, and special attention is paid to the school-aged and adolescent youngster.

Throughout the course explicit connections will be made to learning and to current issues that affect schooling.

EDU 304 - Special Education (3.0 credits)

This course acquaints the students with a wide range of special needs children within a typical classroom setting in a Reformed Christian school.
Suggestions for early detection, referral, and initial modification of programs and materials are presented. In addition, specific teaching approaches (e.g., differentiated instruction) and the role of the teacher in implementing IEPs will be introduced.
Topics such as anxiety and depression will receive special emphasis. Students will be expected to tailor their readings and assignments to reflect their Primary/Junior or Junior/Intermediate specialization.

EDU 305 - Learning Theories and Assessment (3.0 credits)

The first part of the course provides an overview of behaviourist, cognitive, and constructivist theories of learning. Their relevance to the classroom setting are examined and evaluated from the Biblical perspective that every child is uniquely created by God.
The second part of the course examines the role of assessment for, as, and of learning as a vital component of the instructional process. The Ontario Ministry of Education Growing Success document forms a central resource for this course. Topics include traditional testing, the use of rubrics and authentic, performance-based, portfolio assessment, and differentiated instruction and assessment. Students are expected to apply the course assignments in a way that reflects their Primary/Junior or Junior/Intermediate specialization.


400 - Curriculum Methods Studies

Curriculum Studies consist of courses that provide teacher candidates with subject-specific content and pedagogical knowledge specific to such content. These courses equip teachercandidates with background knowledge and an understanding of the nature and purpose of the various disciplines in the elementary and/or secondary school curriculum. Teacher candidates will be equipped with skills for planning, teaching, and assessment in the context of specific disciplines. Curriculum Studies courses are linked to the expectations outlined in Ontario Ministry of Education curriculum documents, and reflect the applications to Reformed Christian schools.

DT 401 - The Arts: Visual Art (3.0 credits)

This course acquaints students with the language of art, explores art in its variety of forms, and investigates a wide variety of materials and equipment. This course aims to equip teacher candidates with the knowledge and skills to teach art with confidence and imagination, fostering in their students a greater appreciation for the aesthetic dimensions of God’s creation.

DT 402 - French as a Second Language 1 and 2 (3.0 credits)

Both courses focus on improving the student’s own French language skills. Student achievement upon entrance to either course will determine whether a student takes a course at a general or advanced level. Both courses also promote student growth and development in becoming responsible, competent, and creative French language teachers for elementary schools. Through a variety of activities, students will practise listening, speaking, reading, and writing French in the context of French culture studies. Assignments and activities are designed to provide students with ideas and activities for their future classrooms

DT 403 - French as a Second Language 2 (3.0 credits)

Both courses focus on improving the student’s own French language skills. Student achievement upon entrance to either course will determine whether a student takes a course at a general or advanced level.  Both courses also promote student growth and development in becoming responsible, competent, and creative French language teachers for elementary schools. Through a variety of activities, students will practise listening, speaking, reading, and writing French in the context of French culture studies. Assignments and activities are designed to provide students with ideas and activities for their future classrooms. 

DT 404 - Language Arts: Reading (3.0 credits)

This course is an introduction to the teaching of language arts in the elementary school.  It examines connections among the six language arts:  reading, listening, speaking, representing, viewing, and writing. Although the emphasis is on the reading component, students will be equipped to prepare a well-balanced language arts program for their future classrooms. Theoretical issues as well as practical classroom applications (e.g., programming, planning, methodology, resources, assessment, etc.) are examined.

DT 405 - Language Arts: Writing (3.0 credits)

This course focuses on teaching elementary school children to write effectively in a variety of genres. Building on the connection between writing and reading, this course introduces students to the traits of good writing and the process of writing.  Students will also be introduced to frameworks used in elementary schools for teaching the language arts (e.g., Four Blocks, 6+1 Traits of Writing). This course has a dual focus:  the development of students’ own writing and the teaching of writing across the various age levels of the elementary school.  Students are shown how to design teaching activities as well as checklists and rubrics that help the teacher assess not only the content and form of students’ writing, but also how well children use the process of writing.  

DT 407 - Mathematics (3.0 credits)

Introduction to the content and teaching methodology of mathematics in Christian elementary schools. Historical and theoretical underpinnings of mathematics education (e.g., constructivism, conceptual/procedural understanding) are explored in the context of teaching and learning mathematics. Students will become acquainted with The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 1-8: Mathematics, 2005 through a thorough introduction to the five strands of the mathematics curriculum. Students will also consider the place of various mathematics programs (e.g., JUMP, Saxon, Math Makes Sense, etc.) in the development of a lesson plan for an elementary mathematics lesson.

DT 408 - The Arts - Music (3.0 credits)

This course explores the place of music in today’s Christian classroom with an emphasis on developing the students’ own skills in learning and teaching music at the elementary level. Music theory and music history are reviewed, and teaching strategies based on the Kodaly and Orff methods are introduced. Practice in leading singing and in playing the recorder is provided.

DT 409 - Physical Education and Health (3.0 credits)

This course is an introduction to the teaching of physical education in the context of a biblical orientation to the subject content, theory, and practice.  Movement concept and skill, physical fitness, personal health and wellness, skill mechanics, activity/games skill development, and positive social skills development form the core of the course. Instructional effectiveness, lesson planning and delivery, long-term organization and evaluation, and structuring student participation are also included.

DT 410 - Science and Technology (3.0 credits)

Introduction to the content and teaching methodology of science in Christian elementary schools. Historical and theoretical underpinnings of science education (e.g., constructivism, conceptual understanding, inquiry method) are explored in the context of teaching and learning science. Students will become acquainted with the Ontario Curriculum Grades 1-8 Science and Technology.

DT 411 - Social Studies: History and Geography (3.0 credits)

This course examines the purpose, content, teaching/learning, and assessment of Social Studies/History and Geography in the elementary and middle school (K-8) from a Biblical perspective with special reference to the Ontario curriculum. Current events, Canadian icons, and indigenous awareness receive special attention.

EDU 402 - French as a Second Language (3.0 credits)

The focus is two-fold: Improving one’s own French language skills, and becoming a responsible, competent, and creative French language teacher with Primary/Junior or Junior/Intermediate applications to elementary schools. Through a variety of activities, students will practice listening, speaking, reading, and writing French in the context of French culture studies. Assignments and activities are designed to provide students with ideas and activities for future classroom applications.

EDU 404 - Language Arts: Reading (3.0 credits)

This course is an introduction to the teaching of language arts in the elementary school. It examines connections among the six language arts: reading, listening, speaking, representing, viewing, and writing. Although the emphasis is on the reading component, students will be equipped to prepare a well-balanced language arts program for their future classrooms. Theoretical issues as well as practical classroom applications (e.g., programming, planning, methodology, resources, assessment, etc.) are examined.

EDU 405 - Language Arts: Writing (3.0 credits)

This course focuses on teaching elementary school children to write effectively in a variety of genres. Building on the connection between writing and reading, this course introduces students to the traits of good writing and the process of writing. Students will also be introduced to frameworks used in elementary schools for teaching the language arts (e.g., Four Blocks, 6+1 Traits of Writing). This course has a dual focus: the development of students’ own writing and the teaching of writing across the various age levels of the elementary school. Students are shown how to design teaching
activities as well as checklists and rubrics that help the teacher assess not only the content and form of students’ writing, but also how well children use the process of writing.

EDU 407 - Mathematics (3.0 credits)

Introduction to the content and teaching methodology of mathematics in Christian elementary schools.  Historical and theoretical underpinnings of mathematics education (e.g., constructivism, conceptual/procedural understanding) are explored in the context of teaching and learning mathematics.  Students will become acquainted with The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 1-8, Grades 9 and 10 Mathematics: Primary/Junior specialists (grades 1-6); Junior/iIntermediate specialists (grades 4-10).  Students will also consider the place of various mathematics programs (e.g., JUMP, Saxon, Math Makes Sense, etc.) in the development of a lesson plan for an elementary mathematics lesson.

EDU 409 - Physical Education and Health (3.0 credits)

This course is an introduction to the teaching of physical education in the context of a Biblical orientation to the subject content, theory, and practice.  Movement concept and skill, physical fitness, personal health and wellness, skill mechanics, activity/games skill development, and positive social skills development form the core of the course. Instructional effectiveness, lesson planning and delivery, long-term organization and evaluation, and structuring student participation are also included.  The Primary/Junior or Junior/Intermediate specializations will be addressed using the Ontario Curriculum Grades 1-8 Health and Physical Education.

EDU 410 - Science and Technology (3.0 credits)

Introduction to the content and teaching methodology of science in Christian elementary schools. Historical and theoretical underpinnings of science education (e.g., constructivism, conceptual understanding, inquiry method) are explored in the context of teaching and learning science. Students will become acquainted with the Ontario Curriculum Grades 1-8 Science and Technology, Grades 9 and 10 Science: Primary/Junior specialists (grades 1-6); Junior/intermediate specialists (grades 4-10).

EDU 411 - Social Studies: History and Geography (3.0 credits)

This course provides an in-depth examination of the purpose, content, teaching/learning, and assessment of Social Studies/History and Geography in the elementary and middle school (K-8) from a biblical perspective. Primary/Junior and Junior/Intermediate specializations will be addressed through the application of the Ontario Curriculum. Special attention will be given to writing a position paper about a current topic and to developing a unit based on a historical novel.

EDU 413 - The Arts: Music and Visual Arts (3.0 credits)

This course consists of two modules: One dealing with music in which the place of music in today’s Reformed Christian classroom is explored, with an emphasis on developing the student’s skills in learning and teaching music at Primary/Junior or Junior/Intermediate. Music theory and music history are reviewed, and teaching strategies based on the Kodaly and Orff methods are introduced. Practice in leading singing and in playing the recorder is provided.
The second module acquaints students with the language of art, explores art in its variety of forms, and investigates a wide variety of materials and equipment. This course aims to equip teacher candidates with the knowledge and skills to teach Primary/Junior or Junior/Intermediate art with confidence and imagination, fostering in their students a greater appreciation for the aesthetic dimensions of God’s creation.


500 - Culture, Ethics, and Worldview Studiessional Studies

Culture, Ethics, and Worldview Studies consist of courses designed to help teacher candidates develop a discerning mind as Reformed Christian teachers living in the midst of an ever-changing culture. Through these courses, teacher candidates will apply Biblical norms and values to the study of literary works, ethics, worldview and apologetics, and standards of professional practice.

DT 501 - Anglo-Saxon to Neo-Classical (3.0 credits)

An examination of seminal works over the period, including a major work by Shakespeare, with some emphasis on historical and cultural contexts as a means to better understanding individual texts and the development of English literature overall. Students will develop their academic writing and research skills.

DT 502 - Romantic to Postmodern (3.0 credits)

A study of poetic, dramatic and prose forms from a wide range of historical periods and   social contexts. Through textual analysis and close reading, this course acquaints students with the characteristic techniques and styles of influential writers and movements within English literature. Students will continue to advance their abilities in essay writing and assessing secondary sources.  

DT 503 - Perspectives on Literature (3.0 credits)

This course explores the connections between philosophy and theories of reading in the classical, medieval, modern and post-modern eras. The approaches to literature in these four major phases in the history of ideas will be related to major paradigms of thought in order to examine how people’s foundational beliefs shape their perspective on literature. We will illustrate the perspectives offered by the philosophies in the theoretical writings with representative selections of literature, art and music.

DT 504 - Survey of Children’s Literature (3.0 credits)

This course is a survey of the literary genres found in children’s books. Students will explore the role of children’s literature as a reflection of culture throughout all times and places, including the challenges of critical literacy and censorship. The course is intended to broaden the teacher candidate’s own knowledge of children’s books across a wide range of age, interest, fiction/non-fiction categories with a focus on a Primary/Junior or Junior/Intermediate area of specialization.  In addition to developing an extensive annotated bibliography of their own readings, students will familiarize themselves with the body of work of one particular author/ illustrator of choice. Special attention will be paid to indigenous writings, and award-winning books (e.g., Canadian Children’s Book  Centre, Newbery, Caldecott). The use of trade books to structure and support a classroom language arts program will be emphasized throughout the course.

EDU 503 - Perspectives on Literature (3.0 credits)

This course introduces students to perspectives on literature from the classical, medieval, modern, and post-modern eras, and it invites students to develop their own perspective on literature in the light of Scripture and the Reformed confessions. As a seminar-style class, students take a leading role in the discussion of assigned readings throughout the course.

EDU 504 - Survey of Children’s Literature (3.0 credits)

This course is a survey of the literary genres found in children’s books. Students will explore the role of children’s literature as a reflection of culture throughout all times and places, including the challenges of critical literacy and censorship. The course is intended to broaden the teacher candidate’s own knowledge of children’s books across a wide range of age, interest, fiction/non-fiction categories with a focus on a Primary/Junior or Junior/Intermediate area of specialization.  In addition to developing an extensive annotated bibliography of their own readings, students will familiarize themselves with the body of work of one particular author/illustrator of choice. Special attention will be paid to indigenous writings, and award-winning books (e.g., Canadian Children’s Book  Centre, Newbery, Caldecott). The use of trade books to structure and support a classroom language arts program will be emphasized throughout the course.

EDU 506 - Foundations of Reformed Identity: Worldview and Apologetics (3.0 credits)

Using a historical and chronological approach, the course presents a survey of main philosophical themes arising out of the history of Western thought. Students will seek to find answers to questions that are common among today’s Christians in the Western world. Cognizant of their chosen vocation as future teachers, students will articulate a Christian worldview that will assist them in defending their faith in the context of society.

EDU 507 - Foundations of Reformed Ethics and Standards of Practice (3.0 credits)

The norms of Scripture and the principles derived from the Ten Commandments will be applied to ethical issues in society and education. Special attention will be given to The Ethical Standards for the Teaching Profession (OCT, 2016) and their implications for professional practice in Reformed Christian schools. One module focuses on Christian intellectual character development for teacher candidates and the application in a Primary/Junior or Junior/Intermediate classroom setting.


600 - Teaching Studies - Teaching at the Primary/Junior; Junior/Intermediate Divisions

DT: Teaching Studies consist of courses informed by educational theory to help teacher candidates develop skills for effective classroom practice. Beginning with an introduction to teaching and initial practicum preparation, the courses develop readiness for induction into the teaching profession through a focus on skills such as classroom management, narration as a teaching methodology, differentiated instruction, lesson planning, use of technology, and unit design.

EDU: Teaching Studies consist of courses informed by educational theory to help teacher candidates develop skills for effective classroom practice at the Primary/Junior or Junior/Intermediate level. Beginning with an introduction to teaching and initial practicum preparation, the courses develop readiness for induction into the teaching profession through a focus on skills such as classroom management, narration as a teaching methodology, differentiated instruction, lesson planning, use of technology, and unit design

DT 601 - Teaching Studies 1: Introduction to Teaching; Academic Writing (3.0 credits)

The focus of this course is on lesson planning, essential presentation skills, introduction to curriculum, and preparation for practicum placement. Students are given the opportunity to develop skills in narration particularly as it applies to the teaching of Bible. 

DT 602 - Teaching Studies 2: Technology in the Classroom (3.0 credits)

Students will examine the place of information and communication technology in teaching and learning. This includes the theoretical elements (e.g., a Biblical worldview in relation to technology, current research, and a critical review of how we manage the impact technology has on our lives) as well as practical applications. The emphasis will be both on teaching and on learning with technology. Students will be expected to apply their learning by developing a technology-guided lesson as well as a professional (e)portfolio.

DT 603 - Teaching Studies 3: Teaching for Understanding; Classroom Management (3.0 credits)

The major focus of this course is on developing student understanding. Teacher candidates will be introduced to the six facets of understanding (Wiggins & McTighe, 2005) along with nine instructional strategies (Dean et al., 2012) that aim to develop student understanding. The last module in the course will provide an introduction to classroom management and discipline. Students will craft a classroom management plan that will be included in their professional portfolio.

DT 604 - Teaching Studies 4: Teaching Strategies; Narration as Methodology (3.0 credits)

This course develops a theoretical foundation for narration as methodology. Its practical application builds planning and delivery skills and confidence for narration as a teaching strategy across the curriculum. Other teaching methods and strategies will be reviewed also.

DT 605 - Teaching Studies 5: Planning for Instruction; Differentiated Instruction (3.0 credits)

With specific references to their Primary/Junior or Junior/Intermediate specialization, students will apply the Understanding by Design model to all aspects of unit planning and delivery. Included in this course is an in-depth review of the application of differentiated instruction as an effective means of reaching all learners in a Reformed Christian school.

DT 606 - Teaching Studies 6: Induction into the Teaching Profession (3.0 credits)

In this culminating course, students will examine the professional qualities and characteristics necessary to become a successful teacher. Topics include reporting student progress and parent-teacher conferences, a review of the application and appointment process, contracts and salary schedules, handbooks and policies, short- and long-term planning, and preparing to enter the teaching profession in a Reformed Christian school.

EDU 607 - Teaching Studies 1: Introduction to Teaching; Classroom Management (3.0 credits)

This course focuses on lesson planning, essential presentation skills, classroom management, and preparation for practicum placement. Students are given opportunity to develop skills in narration particularly as it applies to the teaching of Bible. Students are expected to focus on readings and assignments in keeping with their Primary/Junior or Junior/Intermediate specialization. 

EDU 608 - Teaching Studies 2: Technology in the Classroom (3.0 credits)

With a view to their Primary/Junior or Junior/Intermediate specializations, students will examine the place of information and communication technology in teaching and learning. This includes the theoretical elements (a Biblical worldview in relation to technology, current research, and a critical review of how we manage the impact technology has on our lives) as well as practical applications. The emphasis will be both on teaching and on learning with technology. Students will be expected to apply their learning by developing a technology guided lesson as well as a professional (e)portfolio.

EDU 609 - Teaching Studies 3: Planning for Instruction; Differentiated Instruction (3.0 credits)

With specific references to their Primary/Junior or Junior/Intermediate specialization, students will apply the Understanding by Design model to all aspects of unit planning and delivery. Included in this course is an in-depth review of the application of differentiated instruction as an effective means of reaching all learners in a Reformed Christian school.

EDU 610 - Teaching Studies 4: Induction into the Teaching Profession (3.0 credits)

In this culminating course, students will examine the professional qualities and characteristics necessary to become a successful Primary/Junior or Junior/Intermediate teacher. Topics include reporting student progress and parent-teacher conferences, a review of the application and appointment process, contracts and salary schedules, handbooks and policies, short- and long-term planning, and preparing to enter the teaching profession in a Reformed Christian school.


700 - Field Experience: Practica

DT: The practicum experience is designed to provide teacher candidates the opportunity to put theory into practice. During classroom placements, teacher candidates will observe and practise teaching, while developing their lesson planning, lesson delivery, and assessment skills. practicum placements within their area of specialization also allow teacher candidates to acquire the skills to work with colleagues, develop their understanding of students, and respond to a wide range of student needs. With a minimum of 90 days in the classroom, teacher candidates are required to demonstrate narrative reflective practice and self-assessment by by providing a practicum portfolio of artifacts (including a logbook) as evidence of their learning in key areas.

EDU; The practicum experience is designed to provide teacher candidates the opportunity to put theory into practice. During classroom placements, teacher candidates will observe and practise teaching, while developing their lesson planning, lesson delivery, and assessment skills. Practicum placements within their area of specialization (Primary/Junior or Junior/Intermediate) also allow teacher candidates to acquire the skills to work with colleagues, develop their understanding of students, and respond to a wide range of student needs. With a minimum of 90 days in the classroom, teacher candidates are required to demonstrate narrative reflective practice and self-assessment by providing a practicum portfolio of artifacts (including a logbook) as evidence of their learning in key areas.


Diploma of Education

EDU 700 - Practicum (3.0 credits)

Field experience comprises an important component of teacher candidates learning. Practice teaching offers students opportunities to develop competency across key areas: curriculum knowledge, planning, instruction, classroom management, and professionalism.

Practicum placements are arranged in cooperation with a school Principal or his/her designate. Associate teachers, teacher candidates, school administration, and College supervisors follow the procedures and policies outlined in the CCRTC Practicum Guidelines.

EDU 707 - Practicum 1 (3.0 credits)

 4 weeks of practicum

EDU 708 - Practicum 2 (3.0 credits)

5 weeks of practicum

EDU 709 - Practicum 3 (3.0 credits)

4 weeks of practicum

EDU 710 - Practicum 4 (3.0 credits)

5 weeks of practicum


Diploma of Teaching

DT 700 - Practicum (3.0 credits)

Field experience comprises an important component of student learning. Practice teaching offers teacher candidates opportunities to develop competency across key areas: curriculum knowledge, planning, instruction, classroom management, and professionalism.

Practicum placements are arranged in cooperation with a school Principal or his/her designate. Associate teachers, teacher candidates, school administration, and College supervisors follow the procedures and policies outlined in the CCRTC Practicum Guidelines.

DT 701 - Practicum 1 (3.0 credits)

3 weeks of practicum

DT 702 - Practicum 2 (3.0 credits)

4 weeks of practicum

DT 703 - Practicum 3 (3.0 credits)

3 weeks of practicum

DT 704 - Practicum 4 (3.0 credits)

4 weeks of practicum

DT 705 - Practicum 5 (3.0 credits)

4 weeks of practicum

DT 706 - Practicum 6 (3.0 credits)

5 weeks of practicum


800 - Professional Portfolio

Teacher candidates are required to develop a professional e-portfolio that reflects the narrative of the teacher candidate’s personal and professional growth and development. Components of the portfolio are incorporated into several courses in the program. In their final year at CCRTC, teacher candidates complete their portfolios in preparation for the application, interview, and hiring process. A professional portfolio should contain items such as: A cover letter, a résumé, statements of Reformed Christian education and faith, and summaries of practicum experiences and learning.

DT 800 - Professional Portfolio (3.0 credits)

Students are required to develop a professional (e)portfolio during their studies at CCRTC. The portfolio is intended to reflect the narrative of the teacher candidate’s personal and professional growth and development. Components of the portfolio have been incorporated into various courses in both programs. In their final year at CCRTC, students complete their portfolios in preparation for the application, interview, and hiring process. A professional portfolio should contain: a cover letter, a résumé, statements of Reformed education and faith, summaries of practicum experiences and learning, and examples of work as teachers-to-be (e.g., unit plan, position paper).

EDU 800 - Professional Portfolio (3.0 credits)

Students are required to develop a professional (e)portfolio during their studies at CCRTC. The portfolio is intended to reflect the narrative of the teacher candidate’s personal and professional growth and development. Components of the portfolio have been incorporated into various courses in both programs. In their final year at CCRTC, students complete their portfolios in preparation for the application, interview, and hiring process. A professional portfolio should contain: a cover letter, a résumé, statements of Reformed education and faith, summaries of practicum experiences and learning, and examples of work as teachers-to-be (e.g., unit plan, position paper).


900 - Special Focus Topics

During the Winter Semester, teacher candidates in the first and second year of the Diploma of Teaching program participate in a week long exploration of a thematic topic. The intent of these theme weeks is to broaden and deepen the personal knowledge of teacher candidates.
Participation is reflected as a pass/fail on the transcript. Theme week topics include multiculturalism, poverty in the city, persons living with special needs, holocaust studies, foreign mission, and indigenous studies

DT 900 - Special Focus Topics (3.0 credits)

From time to time, CCRTC offers to its students a concentrated study period or a seminar series intended to introduce the students to a topic which is directly relevant to teaching and learning. Examples include First Nations, multiculturalism, poverty, and technology. Students are expected to participate actively by engaging with the topic. A pass/fail evaluation will be included on the student’s transcript.